Contemporary Japanese Writers

« Back to list

Contemporary Japanese Writers

Contemporary Japanese Writers (70)

Contemporary Japanese Writers is a three-volume series that was compiled and published by the Japanese Literature Publishing and Promotion Center (J-Lit Center) between 2007 and 2009. Intended to help bring new Japanese writers and their works to the attention of overseas audiences, each volume introduces 50 authors with brief biographical profiles and synopses of three of their most important works. The 150 featured authors—all but a few still living and actively writing—were selected from the far greater pool of available candidates based on the literary awards they had received and their extensive backlists of titles as yet unknown outside Japan. Authors already familiar to readers abroad—the Nobel laureates Yasunari Kawabata and Kenzaburo Oe, and the much-translated Haruki Murakami and Banana Yoshimoto, for example—were intentionally excluded. The resulting lineup represents the brightest stars of contemporary Japanese literature who, though not yet widely recognized beyond our borders, appear regularly on bestseller lists and garner the greatest attention from reviewers in Japan. The volumes have been well received at book fairs around the world.

Yūichi Shinpo*
2012/03/08 Contemporary Japanese Writers

Yūichi Shinpo*

dddd
By

Yūichi Shinpo {birth_death} worked as an animation director before winning the Edogawa Rampo Prize in 1991 for his novel Rensa (Links). His talents as a novelist blossomed after he received the award. Undoubtedly, his experience as a director has nurtured his storytelling gifts; the ability to pull readers instantly into his world and not let go … Details

Kiyoshi Shigematsu*
2012/03/08 Contemporary Japanese Writers

Kiyoshi Shigematsu*

dddd
By

Kiyoshi Shigematsu {birth_death} writes works that are unique for their “practicality,” according to literary critic Minako Saitō. While Saitō is known for her acerbic tongue, her comment is meant to be neither disparaging nor sarcastic. She praises the dialogue between the middle school students in Eiji for being full of life without the phoniness of characters … Details