Authors

Mari Akasaka

Mari Akasaka 赤坂真理

Mari Akasaka  (1964–)  was born in Tokyo but spent her high school years in the United States before returning to Japan for college. Living abroad during those formative years seems to have instilled in her a keen sensitivity to her body and its changes, along with a uniquely contemplative linguistic sensibility. After graduation, she worked as an editor for an art magazine largely featuring erotica, and made her literary debut in 1995 when her story Kibakusha (The Detonator) was published in a literary journal. Her road novel Vibrator, about a woman who decides on the spur of the moment to travel with a long-haul truck driver after a chance meeting, was short-listed for the Akutagawa Prize in 1999; the story was later adapted into a motion picture, which won numerous awards both domestically and overseas, and it has been translated into multiple languages. The following year Myuzu (Muse) received the Noma Prize for New Writers and was again short-listed for the Akutagawa Prize. Her other works include the 1997 novella Cho no hifu no shita (Under the Butterfly's Skin), and the short-story collections Vaniyu (Vanille) of 1999 and Kare ga kanojo no onna datta koro (When He Was Her Bitch) of 2003. In 2012, her first full-length novel in nine years, Tokyo purizun (Tokyo Prison), became a major literary event, winning the universal acclaim of reviewers and critics. She is regarded as one of the standard bearers of serious literary writing in Japan today.

akasakamari.cocolog-nifty.com/weblog/


Books by Mari Akasaka
  • Book

    Muse

    Mio Akishima is a second-year high school student. Unknown to her parents, she has been working as a model and actress since she was in middle school, after being scouted on the street. When an Italian cameraman berates her for her crooked teeth during a …

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  • Book

    Tokyo Prison

    The author brings a fresh approach to fictionalizing herself as a teenage narrator just out of middle school, turning the vaunted Japanese literary tradition of the "I-novel" back on itself. The overarching theme of the work is the question of Emperor Hir …

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